25 September 2013

Une application mobile pour soutenir les services en français | Métro

Une application mobile pour soutenir les services en français | Métro



La Société Saint-Jean-Baptiste de
Montréal (SSJB) a lancé, mercredi, une application mobile pour évaluer
la qualité des services en français des commerces à Montréal.


L’application mobile intitulée «Moi, j’achète en français» permet de
mesurer sur une échelle de 1 à 10 les entreprises, d’émettre des
commentaires, de publier des photos, en plus de les géolocaliser. La
SSJB espère que cette application permettra d’impliquer les jeunes
Montréalais dans la promotion du français.


«Les jeunes adultes n’ont pas vécu les grandes luttes linguistiques…
ils ne sentent pas que leur langue peut être menacée», a déclaré le
président de la SSJB, Mario Beaulieu.

23 September 2013

Pro-Charter of Quebec Values rally in Montreal draws several hundred supporters

Pro-Charter of Quebec Values rally in Montreal draws several hundred supporters

"I respect everybody and what they do when they go to the synagogue or when they go to a mosque, that's their (business)," she said. "But I don't think it belongs in the public space." ...

Marchers carried cutout fleur-de-lis and Quebec flags. They carried signs that read "'we're born naked and everything else is superfluous" and "secularism that's open to closed religions doesn't work." ...

"For me the freedom of religion should not surpass liberty of expression and if we can't have political badges at work, why should we be allowed religious symbols?," Chantraine said. "It should be the same for everyone." ...

18 September 2013

GM: Maka Kotto’s advice for religious minorities: Accept Quebec values

PQ minister’s advice for religious minorities: Accept Quebec values - The Globe and Mail

A Parti Québécois minister has advice for religious minorities who may have to choose between a spiritual symbol and a job, with the Quebec government’s plan to limit religious dress in public sector workplaces: Set the panther skull aside.
Mr. Kotto, 51, is one of the rare members of a visible minority in the PQ caucus. His view was highly sought on the fractious debate on a dress code that would ban symbols such as the hijab, the turban, large crucifixes, and, presumably, the animist totem that belongs to his family in Africa.
“When people arrive in a new family, the least we can do is to consider the values of the family and accept their values.”



11 September 2013

Quebec’s secular charter is clearly unconstitutional, but could still become law - The Globe and Mail

Quebec’s secular charter is clearly unconstitutional, but could still become law - The Globe and Mail

By contrast, the PQ argues that preventing public servants from exercising religious freedom at work is part of a broader secularism or “state neutrality” with respect to the state’s role vis-a-vis religion. This is a perversion of the principle of the separation of church and state, which is normally regarded as preventing government from imposing particular religious doctrines on citizens (such as requiring children to say the Lord’s Prayer at school). Instead, the PQ government proposes to strip citizens of any overt religious identification when working in the public sector. That is a far cry from a “neutral” state objective.

As an entirely symbolic enterprise, the legislation should fail on the first step of the judicial test for determining whether an infringement of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms is “reasonable in a democratic society,” which states that the government requires a substantial and pressing objective when it seeks to limit a right. In a case on prisoner voting rights, the Supreme Court majority made it clear that objectives which are symbolic in nature are “problematic” and noted that a legislature “cannot use lofty objectives to shield legislation from Charter scrutiny.”

NDP opposes PQ plan to ban religious symbols, Mulcair says - The Globe and Mail

NDP opposes PQ plan to ban religious symbols, Mulcair says - The Globe and Mail

The New Democrats made a submission in 2007 to the Quebec commission that was studying reasonable accommodation and the party decided that its policy would follow the recommendations of that commission, said Guy Caron, MP for Rimouski-Neigette–Témiscouata–Les Basques.


What the Quebec government is proposing is “really very far from the recommendations,” said Mr. Caron. “So it’s easy for us to oppose. This is clearly something that goes against individual right,” he said, “and there is a way to have this debate in Quebec without going as far as this charter (change) is going.”


Gerard Bouchard: Québec ouvre la porte à un débat acrimonieux

Québec ouvre la porte à un débat acrimonieux | Stéphane Bégin | Actualités

«Le ministre vise un appui de la majorité. Et cette majorité proviendra de la population francophone et canadienne-française. Une majorité qui va décider les droits des minorités. Et ce sera la même manière de procéder pour le droit de retrait. La majorité va décider pour la minorité.  Pourtant, c'est à l'État de statuer sur les droits des minorités en fonction des grandes Déclarations des droits de l'homme», lance Gérard Bouchard, lors d'un entretien hier après-midi.


Le professeur de l'Université du Québec à Chicoutimi (UQAC) pense que le projet fera face à un problème de droit important. Il convient qu'un gouvernement peut restreindre et supprimer des droits, mais il doit s'appuyer sur un motif supérieur afin de lui permettre de passer le test du tribunal. Il donne en exemple la loi 101. Il s'agissait d'un motif impérieux, car il fallait sauver l'avenir de la francophonie québécoise. «Il s'agissait d'un motif supérieur. Même la Cour suprême du Canada a reconnu sa légitimité. Mais là, je ne vois aucun motif supérieur à l'adoption de cette charte. On veut que les employés de l'État laissent tomber les signes religieux afin de rester neutres. Un enseignant portant un signe de sa foi propagerait indûment le goût du religieux, déformerait l'esprit des jeunes. Ça ne repose sur aucune démonstration.»

Gérard Bouchard dénonce aussi l'intention du gouvernement d'accorder un droit de retrait aux villes, aux institutions de l'État. Il craint que le Québec vive une disparité importante sur le port ou non des symboles religieux. «Ce droit de retrait va entraîner une fragmentation juridique du Québec. Un cégep pourrait décider d'interdire le port du voile et un autre le permettre. Une ville pourrait décider de garder ses symboles religieux, de conserver la prière et même d'en ajouter, alors qu'ailleurs ce serait tout le contraire», indique-t-il.

08 September 2013

Marois says no offence meant by immigration comments - Montreal - CBC News

Marois says no offence meant by immigration comments - Montreal - CBC News

Quebec Premier Pauline Marois says she didn’t intend to offend anyone with comments she made about multiculturalism in England earlier this week.
In an exclusive interview with Le Devoir, Marois said multiculturalism in Britain has led to "people beating each other up and setting off bombs," because British society has no clear sense of identity.

07 September 2013

Don Macpherson: PQ winning some, losing some in bid for charter of values

Don Macpherson: PQ winning some, losing some in bid for charter of values


MONTREAL — In Quebec politics, there is no problem that cannot be solved by passing a new law.
This is true even if the only problem to be solved is political.
Even if the Parti Québécois and its new ally, the Coalition Avenir Québec, pretend otherwise in order to justify the need for a “charter of values,” there is no crisis in Quebec over religious accommodations.
- See more at: http://www.proxfly.com/browse.php?u=Oi8vd3d3Lm1vbnRyZWFsZ2F6ZXR0ZS5jb20vb3Bpbmlvbi9NYWNwaGVyc29uK3dpbm5pbmcrc29tZStsb3Npbmcrc29tZStjaGFydGVyK3ZhbHVlcy84ODc5NDE1L3N0b3J5Lmh0bWw%3D&b=5#sthash.Yo9GypyE.dpuf
MONTREAL — In Quebec politics, there is no problem that cannot be solved by passing a new law.
This is true even if the only problem to be solved is political.
Even if the Parti Québécois and its new ally, the Coalition Avenir Québec, pretend otherwise in order to justify the need for a “charter of values,” there is no crisis in Quebec over religious accommodations.
- See more at: http://www.proxfly.com/browse.php?u=Oi8vd3d3Lm1vbnRyZWFsZ2F6ZXR0ZS5jb20vb3Bpbmlvbi9NYWNwaGVyc29uK3dpbm5pbmcrc29tZStsb3Npbmcrc29tZStjaGFydGVyK3ZhbHVlcy84ODc5NDE1L3N0b3J5Lmh0bWw%3D&b=5#sthash.Yo9GypyE.dpuf
MONTREAL — In Quebec politics, there is no problem that cannot be solved by passing a new law.
This is true even if the only problem to be solved is political.
Even if the Parti Québécois and its new ally, the Coalition Avenir Québec, pretend otherwise in order to justify the need for a “charter of values,” there is no crisis in Quebec over religious accommodations.
- See more at: http://www.proxfly.com/browse.php?u=Oi8vd3d3Lm1vbnRyZWFsZ2F6ZXR0ZS5jb20vb3Bpbmlvbi9NYWNwaGVyc29uK3dpbm5pbmcrc29tZStsb3Npbmcrc29tZStjaGFydGVyK3ZhbHVlcy84ODc5NDE1L3N0b3J5Lmh0bWw%3D&b=5#sthash.Yo9GypyE.dpuf